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Poster: dr. flashback Date: Feb 27, 2011 10:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: TDIH - 2/28/69

http://www.archive.org/details/gd69-02-28.sbd.16track.kaplan.3397.sbeok.shnf

Yes, I know you can't stream it anymore. But if you're a Deadhead and don't have a copy of this classic show by now
(even my grandmother got it FTP in 1999) or weren't lucky enough to buy the 1969 Fillmore Box - well, you must be living under a rock.
Possibly the best show of the year. Set One is just simply good. But Set Two is totally off the charts!! Practically one long jam - from the opening of Cryptical to the Feedback, nonstop in your face Dead all the way.
Ahhhh..... to go back to 1969.
1. People still stood up to the military industrial complex
and questioned authority.
2. There were no cell phones.
3. People still had some privacy.
4. People actually talked to each other face to face.
5. There was no Lady Gaga or Justin Beeby-face.
6. You could still score an ounce of decent weed for under
$30.
7. Guitars still sounded like well, guitars!
8. Bobby still wore normal pants.
9. Instead of pointless arguing about global warming, we cared about clean water, clean air and protecting the forests and animals. They picked up all the trash at Woodstock.
10. The ADHD epidemic had not yet caught on, and people actually had time and the mental skills to listen to a whole album, instead of skipping through iTunes on their iPod like hyped up monkeys.

Enough old coot ranting - just listen to this show, somehow!! It won't do ya no harm!!

enjoy the memories,
Dr. Flashback :-)

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 28, 2011 5:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

Hey Doc--thanks for putting in the good word for me; folks here don't usually stand for comments about Bob's garments, but coming from you, and now me, perhaps they'll cut us some slack...

Kids today--what do they know, eh?

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Feb 28, 2011 6:23pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

No we won't cut you any SLACKS ... we might cut you some SHORTS though. Heee hee

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Poster: Jim F Date: Feb 28, 2011 2:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

I like to think that this amazing show is sortof like the 1969 version of 2/14/68, if that makes any sense. Like how Anthem of the Sun album should/would/could have been, had it been recorded 6 months to a year later. I dunno. Dumb metaphor. GREAT SHOW.

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Poster: buscameby Date: Feb 28, 2011 7:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

That is a great show, since I don't have a copy here at work , I found this FW beauty to supplant the loss.

http://www.archive.org/details/gd1968-08-21.sbd.cousinit.17689.shnf

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Poster: DeadRed1971 Date: Feb 28, 2011 7:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

One of the coolest posters is from this run:

http://www.deadlists.com/posters/1960s/19690227-14x21-hg.jpg

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Poster: clementinescaboose Date: Feb 27, 2011 11:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

thanks a lot for this one, a personal favorite. the Alligator>Caution segue might be the best ever! sometimes shows like this make me wish i was old enough to have lived during 1969, as much as i do love technology.

you probably have no idea who i am, but i know you haven't been around these parts in a while, so welcome back! love your show reviews, btw...

edit - that should read 'infrequently as of late'. guess we don't need to throw you a party or anything. either way, hello to you sir.

This post was modified by clementinescaboose on 2011-02-28 07:17:39

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Poster: dead-head_Monte Date: Feb 28, 2011 11:02am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

"Yes, I know you can't stream it. Ahhhh... to go back to 1969"

I was a senior in high school in '69. Back then, "major events" in the "recent past" used to matter a lot to everyone. I was still a 17 y.o. punk from NJ on this TDIH. But, like you, I also witnessed and took notice of the most meaningful stuff going on around me, my family, my friends, and my community.

11) Working people ("workers") were just "average people". Today workers are vilified, disrespected, and they are called every name in the book by the mainstream press and "the news media". As multi-millionaires and billionaires see it, workers deserve nothing. Workers and their families are the most despised people on Earth.

12) The USA had a great Manufacturing sector. In the USA during the 1960s, two-thirds (65%) of the non-agricultural jobs were in Manufacturing. Today the number of manufacturing jobs here is less than 10%.

13) We had an excellent Space Program. NASA sent men to the moon in 1969. Today NASA is irrelevant.

14) The Peace Movement was taking hold in 1969. The thought that 35 years later the USA would torture people, disappear people, hold US citizens in secret prisons indefinitely - without charges, was an incredulous thought in 1969.

15) A good profit for businesses in 1969 would have been 15%. In my neighborhood, if your business was making a 20% profit, "you were making a Killing!" Today, shareholders, investors, and fund managers demand businesses make 500% to 800% profits.

16) In 1969, The Vietnam War was discussed everyday. Today, our Wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and elsewhere are never discussed. The News Media's reporting back in 1969 was reasonably informative, truthful, substantive, tangible, and peer-reviewed. (Sure, there was a lot of spin going on.) Today we have huge corporations owning and operating propaganda-run News Rooms and Reality-TV news programs. Our universities are cutting back on their Journalism Curriculum. CU in Boulder, Colorado, is replacing its School of Journalism, for example. Now Glenn Beck is rewriting everything.

17) No one had credit cards. Everyone had a savings account.

18) In 1969 an ounce of schwag was no more than $10 or $15. An ounce of Jamaican was $25 or $30. An ounce of Colombian was $40. Today an ounce of 5-star is $400.

This post was modified by dead-head_Monte on 2011-02-28 19:02:45

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Poster: dr. flashback Date: Feb 28, 2011 4:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

Monte,
this is a case where your reply was better than my post!
All your items are so true, the degree to which my country
has changed since 1969 is unbelievable to me, and frightening.
Yeah - remember when America MADE things??
Makes me want to call you brother and pass you a smoke.

I've got a tear in my eye and my fist in the air.

Dr. Flashback :-)

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Poster: dead-head_Monte Date: Feb 28, 2011 7:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

TDIH's Lovelight track is playing. Holy Shit!!!

The Eleven is off the charts! Phil & Jerry's interplay is amazing. This is Hall of Fame material all the way.

This post was modified by dead-head_Monte on 2011-03-01 03:52:18

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Poster: user unknown Date: Feb 28, 2011 7:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

Monte you and I are very close to the same age and I agree with most of your post. I do have to disagree on one point ;

"The thought that 35 years later the USA would torture people, disappear people, hold US citizens in secret prisons indefinitely - without charges, was an incredulous thought in 1969."

This is exactly what we were afraid of, and trying to get people to see the way thinks were headed. Hell, we all had friends who were "tortured"(OK, a little strong) but had their asses handed to them by the local constabulary(or the local rednecks)for nothing more than having long hair and the balls to speak out against the things we thought were wrong.

I echo the sentiments of the good doctor...
"Makes me want to call you brother and pass you a smoke.

I've got a tear in my eye and my fist in the air."

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Feb 28, 2011 1:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

Amen brother...

I grew up in Detroit (almost identical age as you Monte) - and you're dead on. The guys with factory jobs made a decent wage and were the pillars of the neighborhood. In that day, the war was on everyone's mind - you never knew when a friend would be coming back... in a body bag. Today it's buried on page 23 if it's there at all. Nixon was tossed on his ass for far less than anything done by the Bush-Cheney-Halliburton administration.

Journalism today is a joke, and Frank Rich is my hero, one of the few.

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Poster: midnightcarousel Date: Feb 28, 2011 6:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

"people actually had time and the mental skills to listen to a whole album, instead of skipping through iTunes on their iPod like hyped up monkeys."

HAHAHA! Thanks for reminding me to listen, Dr. F, I love this show. It's actually my favorite Dark Star of the run.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Feb 28, 2011 1:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

I'd point out that if they'd had cell phones in the '60s, Woodstock would have been a glowing sea of cell phones.

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Poster: dr. flashback Date: Feb 28, 2011 4:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

Yeah, and everybody would have been so busy talking on their
damn phones, they would have missed the music, LOL!

Gotta admit though - if there were cell phones in 1969,
we'd have lots of great video clips of the concert !!!

Dr. Flashback :-)

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Poster: dead-head_Monte Date: Feb 28, 2011 5:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

I just leeched this TDIH from The Bus, and put it on. Jer's vocals on this Dew-opener are beautiful, powerful, and fresh. They "Dew it" beautifully. Schoolgirl is next, it's brilliant. It was taped on 16-track reels. The mix is wonderful. It says Seth Kaplan was involved in the transfer. I wonder if he's Jeff Kaplan's brother? Charlie would know? This show is worth having. You're right-on!

Thanks for the heads-up. I'm enjoying listening to this show. Peace.

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Poster: scotch_glass Date: Feb 28, 2011 4:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

I've been listening to this show off an on all day today (ironically like a hyped up monkey on my Ipod). Amazing show, a lot of good playing here, some my favorite parts that I keep re-listening to is from about 13:50 on in the Other One and Death Death Don't Have No Mercy, Jerry's playing in the former and latter are simply amazing... in my opinion.

As a relatively young, 29, member of this forum, I can appreciate much of Dr. F and Monte's comments despite never living in those times. Things seemed so much simpler back then and I can only imagine the enviornment and experience of a concert of any kind compared today. So many people are concerned with filming the show on their cell phones to post on YouTube to prove that they were there, they arent even aware of WHY they are there and WHAT they are witnessing. Sad, really.

Great show here, can't wait to give tomorrow's show from this Fillmore run a good listen during the day.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 28, 2011 8:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

>seemed so much simpler back then

Are you kidding?!? I was a kid then, and even I remember the feeling that the world was absolute chaos. War, protests, burning cities, maybe there'd be a revolution ...

On the radio you might not hear what we all listen to now that exemplifies experimental 60s music, like the TDIH :-), but even as a little kid I'd hear songs like Ball of Confusion, mixed with songs about this revolutionary idea called love that was apparently shocking to the grown-ups ...

It was most definitely not a simpler time. But different? Yeah, for sure.

Here are two songs I remember feeling encapsulated the World Outside.

The chaotic, war-filled, falling-apart, edge-of-revolution times (updated visually, which makes an interesting contrast):


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miZWYmxr8XE

And the hippies/alternative values my folks groused about (I just love these shots; so very real and unglamorized and of-the-times in a genuine way):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZUdzr9e2GQ&;feature=related

I guess that's definitely one difference. Could you possibly imagine songs like that on the radio now, being part of popular culture and even making an impact on little kids?!?

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Poster: scotch_glass Date: Mar 1, 2011 3:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

I didn't mean to disrespect the society of that time by labeling it as "simpler", I was referring to the points made about other factors (like privacy, respect of environment, cell phones, etc) I agree with your point, "different" should've been the term used.

It seems that every other generation grows up during times of war and sadly that will probably never change. That being said, the impact of freedom of speech seemed more powerful during that time. Sit- ins, protests and non- violent rallies have now been replaced with any nut job with internet access starting a blog to feel relevant, talk radio shows filled with hateful rhetoric, and violent attempts at upheaval of governments via terrorist attacks, shootings and riots. Sure those things happened back then, but they weren't always covered by dozens of television stations, hundreds of websites, and thousands of social media updates. My point is/ was, similar things were happening then and now, the only difference is that now, it's harder to ignore because it is nearly impossible to avoid hearing about it.

I guess it's the price you have to pay to be able to stream and download any Grateful Dead show you want though.....

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Mar 1, 2011 6:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH - 2/28/69

Oh, I didn't take it as disrespect -- every time seems "simpler" in retrospect. Hindsight will do that :-)

But yes, freedom of speech did, it seems, absolutely have more impact. I obviously appreciate the web, and we've seen how blogging has impacted the world, yada yada ... but it's awfully easy to say something online and feel you've actually been "heard" and achieved something. Quite a bit different than packing the streets with angry, passionate protesters. Imagine if, instead of marching on Washington in the thousands, civil rights and anti-war protesters had just stuck their opinions on blogs and then gone back to surfing YouTube, feeling as if they'd "done" something ...

(She says in a post on an online forum for a digital music archive, LOL)